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British HIV Association and British Infection Association guidelines on the management of opportunistic infection in people living with HIV:
The clinical management of Candidiasis 2019

Introduction

Advances in the treatment of HIV infection with antiretroviral therapy have led to dramatic reductions in opportunistic infections and death. However, late presentation of HIV remains a problem and is a significant contributory cause of death in people living with HIV in the UK. Individuals who are lost to follow-up or who are not able to adhere to antiretroviral therapy long term can also present with opportunistic infection. In addition, an increasing number of people living with HIV are receiving immunosuppressive medications that can alter susceptibility to opportunistic infection for reasons other than direct HIV replication.

The aim of the opportunistic infection guidelines is to help physicians investigate and manage people living with HIV with, or suspected of having, an opportunistic infection. They are primarily intended to guide practice in the UK and related healthcare systems.

The previous BHIVA/BIA guidelines for the treatment of opportunistic infection 2011 are being updated chapter by chapter using the same general methodology; this chapter provides guidance on the clinical management of candidiasis.


Downloads

British HIV Association and British Infection Association guidelines on the management of opportunistic infection in people living with HIV:
The clinical management of Candidiasis 2019


Additional information

General methodology


Public consultation comments

The comments received during the public consultation can be found below. All comments were reviewed and discussed, and the guidelines amended where appropriate.

Download the comments received by the BHIVA Secretariat during the web consultation process


Declaration of interests

Download the declaration of interests from writing group members


Writing group members

DH Dockrell, University of Edinburgh and Regional Infectious Diseases Unit, NHS Lothian Infection Service, Edinburgh, UK

D O’Shea, University of Edinburgh and Regional Infectious Diseases Unit, NHS Lothian Infection Service, Edinburgh, UK

JD Cartledge, Mortimer Market Centre, London, UK

AR Freedman, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK