You Are Here    News

News
Financial incentives did not improve linkage to care or viral suppression in US study
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-28 10:40
A US study which offered patients gift cards to present themselves for care after testing, and also to stay in care and maintain an undetectable viral load, did not succeed in its main aims and with most patients. Rates of linkage to care, retention in care and viral suppression were not significantly higher in

Tenofovir, boosted atazanavir and boosted lopinavir are associated with cumulative risk of developing chronic kidney disease
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-27 15:00
Three antiretroviral drugs are associated with a slowly increasing rate of chronic kidney disease over time, the CROI 2015 conference heard today. Although the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with normal kidney function was low, with fewer than 1% of patients in the large cohort studied developing it, the use of

Two interferon-free regimens show high HCV cure rates for people with HIV and HCV co-infection
by Liz Highleyman, 2015-02-27 12:20
A pair of two-drug, 12-week regimens containing neither interferon nor ribavirin – sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus either ledipasvir (the Harvoni coformulation) or daclatasvir (Daklinza) – cured hepatitis C for more than 95% of people with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection, with various hepatitis C genotypes, according to two presentations at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses

Tenofovir alafenamide equally effective but safer for kidneys and bones than current formulation
by Liz Highleyman, 2015-02-27 09:30
Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a new formulation that has lower concentrations in the blood but reaches higher levels in cells, is as effective as the older version, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), according to a report at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015) taking place this week in Seattle, USA. A second study showed

Treatment cascades and viral load surveys show how African countries can maximise prevention benefits of HIV treatment
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-27 06:30
Reaching ambitious HIV prevention targets in South Africa will require intensified efforts to engage and retain men and young people in care, in order to increase the proportion of people on treatment with suppressed viral load, a national study has found. The results were presented on Thursday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic

Circumcision is reducing HIV incidence in Uganda, Rakai community study shows
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-27 02:10
The growing uptake of medical male circumcision by men in the Rakai district of Uganda is leading to a substantial reduction in HIV incidence among men in one of the districts of the country worst affected by HIV, Xiangrong Kong of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health told the Conference on Retroviruses and

No HIV transmissions from HIV-positive partner seen in Australian gay couples study
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-27 01:00
An Australian-based study of gay male couples of opposite HIV status (serodifferent couples) has so far seen no transmissions from the HIV-positive partner within the couple in a one-year interim analysis. The Opposites Attract study was announced in 2012 and started at the end of 2013. It recruits gay male serodifferent couples regardless of whether

US PEPFAR abstinence and faithfulness funding had no impact on sexual behaviour in Africa
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-26 23:50
Nearly $1.3 billion spent on US-funded programmes to promote abstinence and faithfulness in sub-Saharan Africa had no significant impact on sexual behaviour in 14 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, an analysis of sexual behaviour data has shown. The preliminary findings were presented by Nathan Lo of Stanford University School of Medicine at the Conference on

HIV maturation inhibitor BMS-955176 looks promising in early study
by Liz Highleyman, 2015-02-26 09:00
A second-generation HIV maturation inhibitor, BMS-955176, demonstrated good safety and high potency, including activity against viral strains that were not susceptible to an earlier drug in this class, researchers reported yesterday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015), taking place this week in Seattle, USA. Combination antiretroviral therapy consists of drugs that target

Starting HIV treatment at CD4 count above 500 reduces the risk of serious illness and death by 44%, African Temprano trial shows
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-26 07:10
Starting treatment at a CD4 cell count above 500 reduced the risk of serious illness including tuberculosis, and death, by 44% when compared to starting treatment according to World Health Orgnaization guidelines, results from the 7-year Temprano study show. The findings were presented on Wednesday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Settale. The

Combining PrEP and ART could almost eliminate HIV infection, east African study finds
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-26 05:30
Giving both pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) to heterosexual couples where one partner has HIV (serodiscordant couples) can almost eliminate the chance of infection in the HIV-negative partner, a study presented at the CROI 2015 conference yesterday has shown. This study was a first in a number of ways. It is the first

XDR-TB in South Africa is largely spread person-to-person, not by failure of drug treatment
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-26 02:50
The vast majority of people with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) diagnosed in the world’s most extensive outbreak have acquired their infection from another person, not as the result of the failure of treatment for multi-drug resistant strains of tuberculosis (MDR-TB), N Sarita Shah told the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle on Wednesday. Kwazulu-Natal

Stopping cotrimoxazole during antiretroviral therapy raises risk of bacterial illness, malaria, Ugandan trial shows
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-26 01:10
Stopping cotrimoxazole prophylaxis increases the risk of serious bacterial infections and malaria, even at high CD4 cell counts, in people taking antiretroviral therapy in Uganda, results of a randomised trial show. The results were presented on Wednesday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle by Dr Jonathan Levin of the United Kingdom’s

Week-on, weekend-off treatment controls viral load in young people
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-25 17:00
Taking an efavirenz-based antiretroviral regimen during the week and taking no medication on two days over the weekend was just as effective as daily treatment in controlling viral load in an 11-country trial conducted among adolescents and young people, Professor Karina Butler of Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, reported at the Conference on Retroviruses

PrEP use rising in San Francisco, but scaling up could further cut new infections
by Liz Highleyman, 2015-02-25 16:00
Use of Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) pre-exposure prophylaxis, better known as PrEP, is increasing in San Francisco, but it is still only reaching about one-third of people who could benefit, and wider use could reduce new HIV infections by 70%, according to a report yesterday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015) in Seattle,

Disappointing result for tenofovir-gel microbicide shows that young women still lack HIV prevention methods they can use
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-25 07:00
Among some highly promising results from HIV prevention studies presented at the CROI 2015 conference today, there was one disappointment. FACTS 001, a study testing the efficacy against HIV of a vaginal microbicide gel containing tenofovir, produced a null result: there was no difference in the HIV infection rate in young women given the

7-country study shows triple-drug combination superior for preventing infant HIV infection
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-25 06:20
Implementing the World Health Organization recommendation of three-drug antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy leads to a significantly lower rate of mother-to-child HIV transmission, a 7-country randomised study has shown. The results of the PROMISE study, conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India, were presented on Tuesday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle. Current WHO

Breastfeeding mothers often undiagnosed in sub-Saharan Africa
by Keith Alcorn, 2015-02-25 06:10
A large proportion of women in sub-Saharan Africa who are at high risk of transmitting HIV to their infants during breastfeeding are likely still to be undiagnosed, if results of a large three-country survey are applicable to other countries with a high prevalence of HIV among pregnant women, according to a study presented by

Pre-exposure prophylaxis also stops 86% of HIV infections in Ipergay study
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-24 20:30
A French and Canadian study of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) presented today at the 2015 CROI Conference in Seattle found that the HIV infection rate in participants taking an intermittent PrEP regime was 86% lower than in people taking an inactive placebo. Extraordinarily, this is exactly the same level of effectiveness that was demonstrated in the

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) stops 86% of HIV infections in PROUD study
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-24 20:20
A study of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the English PROUD study, demonstrated the highest effectiveness yet seen for this method of HIV prevention, the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015) in Seattle, USA, heard today. The effectiveness was 86%; for every 20 infections that might have occurred in participants, 17 were stopped by

Local spending on HIV prevention in England plunges to 70p per person, per year
by Roger Pebody, 2015-02-24 18:00
HIV prevention in England is underfunded and deprioritised, says the National AIDS Trust (NAT). Whereas £55 million was allocated to local activities in 2001-02, the figure for high-prevalence areas in 2014-15 was just over £10 million – which works out as just 70p (US$1) per person, per year. The charity says that this level

Pre-exposure prophylaxis also stops 86% of HIV infections in Ipergay study
by Gus Cairns, 2015-02-24 01:00
A French and Canadian study of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) presented today at the 2015 CROI Conference in Seattle found that the HIV infection rate in participants taking an intermittent PrEP regime was 86% lower than in people taking an inactive placebo. Extraordinarily, this is exactly the same level of effectiveness that was demonstrated in the

Low CD4 count important risk factor for oral HPV infection in patients with HIV
by Michael Carter, 2015-02-23 08:50
A low CD4 count is the single most important risk factor for oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in HIV-positive patients, investigators from the United States report in the online edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. The risk of oral HPV was increased four-fold for individuals with a CD4 count below 200 cells/mm3 compared to patients