You Are Here    Home   News

News
HIV care cascade at Kaiser Permanente varies by sex and age
by Theo Smart, 2014-10-23 09:00
Though there has been improving performance of healthcare delivery at each point of the HIV care cascade, from linkage to care through viral suppression, "success varies significantly by age and gender, even in an integrated care system with equal access to care,” Michael Horberg of the Mid-Atlantic Permanente Research Institute reported earlier this month at

Behavioural and financial incentives may improve HIV treatment outcomes
by Theo Smart, 2014-10-23 08:10
While making medications free can remove barriers to access for individuals who cannot pay for treatment, data suggest that for most people accessing care in industrialised countries, "making medications available for free or low cost will not solve problems with medication non-adherence," according to a presentation by Kevin Volpp from the University of Pennsylvania last week at IDWeek 2014 in

NNRTIs and protease inhibitors both good for first ART, channelling affects choices
by Liz Highleyman, 2014-10-22 09:00
Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and boosted protease inhibitors work equally well for people starting HIV treatment for the first time, with similar viral suppression, CD4 cell gains, and disease progression, according to a large meta-analysis presented at IDWeek 2014 earlier this month in Philadelphia. A related study shed light on factors affecting choice of initial antiretroviral regimen.

Infants in southern Africa start antiretroviral therapy late with advanced disease
by Lesley Odendal, 2014-10-21 09:50
Three quarters of infants starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) across eleven clinics in southern Africa had severe HIV disease and 87.2% met the 2006 World Health Organization (WHO) definition of severe immunosuppression, according to a study presented at the 2014 Southern African HIV Clinicians Society conference in Cape Town, South Africa, last month. There was a modest improvement

No to treating our way out of the epidemic, say South African experts
by Keith Alcorn, 2014-10-21 08:20
No, we cannot treat our way out of the HIV epidemic, was the resounding sentiment of a panel of expert clinicians and the audience, at a debate held at the 2014 Southern African HIV Clinicians Conference in Cape Town last month. Professor Richard Chaisson of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine argued that

No to treating our way out of the epidemic, say South African experts
by Lesley Odendal, 2014-10-21 08:20
No, we cannot treat our way out of the HIV epidemic, was the resounding sentiment of a panel of expert clinicians and the audience, at a debate held at the 2014 Southern African HIV Clinicians Conference in Cape Town last month. Professor Richard Chaisson of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine argued that

Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir safe and effective for genotype 1 HCV
by Liz Highleyman, 2014-10-20 18:30
A single-tablet regimen containing the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleotide polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir and the NS5A inhibitor ledipasvir - the combination in Gilead Science's recently approved Harvoni pill - was well-tolerated and cured 97% of patients with HCV genotype 1 in the Phase 3 ION trials, researchers reported at the IDWeek 2014 meeting earlier this month in Philadelphia. The advent of direct-acting antiviral agents has revolutionized treatment for chronic hepatitis C, especially with the long-awaited

Inflammatory markers associated with development of diabetes in people taking HIV therapy
by Michael Carter, 2014-10-20 10:00
Low-level elevations in important markers of systemic inflammation are associated with the development of type-2 diabetes in people taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), investigators report in the online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. The authors examined the relationship between baseline levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and incident

High effectiveness seen in English PrEP trial
by Gus Cairns, 2014-10-16 13:00
The Steering Committee* of the PROUD trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in gay men in England announced today that participants currently on the deferred arm of the study, who have not yet started PrEP, will be recalled to their clinics and offered the opportunity to begin PrEP ahead of schedule. This is because